a few prosaic days

Besides the Autumn poets sing
A few prosaic days
A little this side of the snow
And that side of the Haze —

~ Emily Dickinson
(The Poems of Emily Dickinson, #123)

After a few muggy, rainy days it felt wonderful to get out for an autumn walk in good weather. It was only in the 40s Friday so we wore our winter coats and headed for Sheep Farm. I realized we had been here in September 2021 and November 2020 but never in October. Fall is in full swing now here. We started down the yellow trail.

10.28.22 ~ Sheep Farm
glacial erratic viewed from the yellow trail
new trail markers on the trees

There were so many leaves on the trail we made good use of the new trail markers to stay on track. Love walking on dry, crunchy leaves…

leaves, moss and lichen on a glacial erratic
waterfall in Fort Hill Brook
amazing root system

The drought seems to be over (or almost over) judging by the water flowing in the brook. The drought map for Connecticut puts us on the line between “none” and “abnormally dry.” We decided to cross the footbridge over the brook and get another view of the waterfall.

waterfall viewed from other side of the brook
the same root system viewed from the other side of the brook
footbridge and huge tree with its amazing roots

The we turned around, heading up the hill and branching off onto the red trail.

golden yellow and burnt orange
other side of glacial erratic viewed from the red trail
tree with leaves in shades of green, rusty orange and brick red

On our way back to the car we encountered a very large group of mothers and children of all ages. They just kept coming and coming and the air was filled with their happy, excited voices. I wondered if they were all being homeschooled. When we got back to the parking lot we laughed because when we had arrived earlier ours had been the only car parked. Now there were a dozen (we counted!) SUVs surrounding us. Can you tell which car is ours? They sure gave us plenty of elbow room!

meadow, woods, old orchard

9.30.22 ~ Coogan Farm Nature & Heritage Center

It felt so good getting out for a long walk in the woods on a cool, crisp autumn day! First we enjoyed the meadows at the entrance to Coogan Farm.

milkweed pods
abundant goldenrod blooming everywhere
bee and asters
can you find the bee?
a stump that was growing out of the crack in a huge boulder

Following a path past the Giving Garden we came to the Gallup Orchard Trail, which winds through the woods before arriving at a forgotten orchard that was recently discovered and is being studied and restored.

a wolf tree welcoming us to the Gallup Orchard Trail,
a relic from farms of the past when trees along the edges of open fields
could spread their branches without competition from other trees
leaf, berries and orbs
ducked under a broken tree
marking the end of the woods and entrance to the orchard

Dating back to the original 1654 Gallup homestead and actively farmed by the Greenman brothers during the age of shipbuilding in the 1800s to feed their shipworkers at what is now Mystic Seaport Museum, the orchard contains clues that will help us uncover the history and heritage of the land.
~ Anna Sawin
(“Apples and Pears, Oh My!” ~ Denison Pequotsepos Nature Center blog post, March 9, 2020)

pear on tree
apple on tree
fall color in the distance

The orchard is on a hill. We entered at the top of the hill and when we found our way down to the bottom we found this sign. The bottom entrance is off the Stillman Mansion Trail. We followed that trail back to the parking lot and encountered a cute little song sparrow, who wasn’t singing, only staring at us apprehensively.

song sparrow

Life starts all over again when it gets crisp in the fall.
~ F. Scott Fitzgerald
(The Great Gatsby)

American burnweed ~ pilewort (thanks to Eliza for the identification)

I hope we get lots of walks in this autumn! 🍂 🍁 🍂

Aaron Newton Case & Laura Amanda Roberts

Tim’s 4th-great-grandfather, Aaron Newton Case, son of Aaron and Margaret (Meacham) Case, was born 24 January 1788 in Simsbury (Hartford) Connecticut, and died 14 February 1870 in Cambridge Junction (Lenawee) Michigan. He married, 26 November 1812 in Windsor (Hartford) Connecticut, Laura Amanda Roberts, who was born 17 November 1792 in Bloomfield (Hartford) Connecticut, and died there 15 November 1829, daughter of Lemuel and Roxey (Gillett) Roberts.

Aaron owned a farm in Simsbury [Bloomfield] until 1832, when he was about 44, and after Laura’s death, he moved to Windsor, Ohio where he purchased a new farm. The 1850 census has him living in Windsor with two of his grandsons, William N., age 3, and Martin E., age 0, and a 16-year-old named Robert Adkins. In 1860 he was living there with his son, Galusha, daughter-in-law, and their six sons. He lived there until 1867, when he was about 79, and then moved to Cambridge Township, Michigan. Apparently Aaron remained a widower for 40 years until his death. He lies buried in Cambridge Junction Cemetery. Laura lies buried in Saint Andrew’s Episcopal Church Cemetery in Bloomfield, Connecticut.


image credit: P Welch at Find a Grave
*
In
memory of
LAURA A, wife of
Aaron N. Case,
who died
Nov. 15, 1829
aged 38

Saint Andrew’s Episcopal Church Cemetery
Bloomfield, Connecticut


image credit: Jeannieology at Find a Grave
*
AARON N. CASE
DIED
FEB. 14, 1870
AGED 82 YRS.

Cambridge Junction Cemetery
Cambridge Township, Michigan


Aaron & Laura were the parents of five children:

1. Luarana Amanda Case, born 9 February 1814 in Bloomfield, died 23 April 1883 in Glenville (Cuyahoga) Ohio. She married 16 July 1836, in Ashtabula (Ashtabula) Ohio, Pharis Wells Cook, who was born 8 March 1813 in East Granby (Hartford) Connecticut, and died 2 July 1882 in Glenville, son of Jesse and Chloë (Phelps) Cook. Laurana & Pharis were the parents of three children.

2. Galusha Aaron Case, born 24 November 1815 in Simsbury, died 29 June 1886 in Detroit (Wayne) Michigan. He married Susan Adeline Bedell, who was born c. 1822 in Schuyler (Herkimer) New York, and died 1 January 1897 in Detroit, daughter of William and Margaretha (Lepper) Bedell. Galusha & Susan were the parents of six sons.

3. Capt. Hermon Roberts Case (Tim’s 3rd-great-grandfather), born 10 April 1818 in Simsbury, died 17 February 1890 in (Lenawee) Michigan. He married (as his first wife) 28 December 1841, Mary Doty, who was born about 1820 in Euclid (Cuyahoga) Ohio, and died 16 March 1845 in East Cleveland (Cuyahoga) Ohio, daughter of Asa Doty. Hermon & Mary were the parents of a daughter. Hermon married (as his second wife), 5 March 1848, Paulina Elizabeth Minor (Tim’s 3rd-great-grandmother), who was born 2 April 1822 in Mendon (Monroe) New York, and died 9 March 1898 in Cambridge (Lenawee) Michigan, daughter of William and Naomi (Reniff) Minor. Hermon & Paulina were the parents of four children.

4. Hiram Newton Case, born 13 October 1822 in Connecticut, died 17 July 1901 in Orwell (Ashtabula) Ohio. He married 12 February 1846 in Ashtabula, Mary Amidon, who was born 12 March 1822 in Ashford (Windham) Connecticut, and died 23 February 1901 in Orwell, daughter of Henry and Clarissa (Roberts) Amidon. Hiram & Mary were the parents of four children.

5. Lemuel Hurley Case, born 4 July 1824 in Connecticut, died 1896. He married 19 November 1850 in (Ashtabula) Ohio, Mary Nye, who was born about 1823 in New York, and died 23 January 1909 in (Cook) Illinois, daughter of Abel and Mary (Stoyell) Nye. Lemuel & Mary were the parents of three children.

a new kid on the block

Betsy

Our goat friends Addie, Crackers, Chai and Brie have a new sidekick who we got to meet yesterday. Betsy is much smaller than Chai and Brie, even though she is the same age as they are, nine months old. She had a rough start in life but now she has a good home and new companions. And she has her tail up more and more often these days.

Brie and Betsy
Addie

Since our last visit we learned that the holiday tree we brought the gang was polished off in no time. See that story here.

Panzer
Betsy
Betsy and Tim

Betsy loves eating grass most of all and is not as interested in grain or goat cracker offerings.

Betsy
Julie and Betsy

Betsy is in very good hands now! 💕 And we had a lovely afternoon catching up with friends. Back at home, I was delighted to find that spring had arrived in my garden.

crocuses in my garden

spring will arrive early here

sunrise at home, 6:58 am, Groundhog Day
2.2.22 ~ Haley Farm State Park, Groton, Connecticut
cloudy, no shadows

We got our groundhogs out for a nice walk this morning. Meet Basil and little Basil, if you haven’t already. For those of my new readers who don’t know the story, Basil is named for my paternal grandfather, who was born on Groundhog Day, February 2, 1882 in a village near the city of Stanislav, now known as Ivano-Frankovsk, Ukraine. When Pop arrived in America in 1909, instead of translating his given name, Wasyl, to its equivalent in English, Basil, he started using the name William, by which he was known for the rest of his life.

fun in the snow
hiding in the stone wall
the path not taken
the path taken

After taking the pictures we decided to walk through a meadow, a path we hadn’t had a chance to follow yet. It was lovely covered in snow, still on the ground four days after the blizzard. But today the temperature got up over freezing so it is starting to melt.

Looks like Friday will be a mess with an ice storm. I was grateful for this lovely day.

the meadow was surrounded on all sides by stone walls

O barren bough! O frozen field!
Hopeless ye wait no more.
Life keeps her dearest promises —
The Spring is at the door!

~ Arthur Ketchum
(The Atlantic Monthly, February 1904)

a little snow still clinging to this tree trunk
path between the meadow and Palmer Cove

four friendly goats

left to right, Chai, Crackers, Brie and Addie

Friday afternoon we had a lovely visit with four very charming goats, and their guardians, our friends Bob & Julie. The kids, Chai and Brie, are seven months old. We brought them a treat to eat, our holiday tree. 🌲 I had a blast with the photo op!

Bob and Chai

Chai loves to be held, although she’s starting to grow out of that a little.

Addie (above) is a fainting goat, which I learned from Bob is a goat with a hereditary condition that may cause her to stiffen or fall over when startled. Thankfully our presence didn’t startle her.

Tim makes a new friend

The fir tree was a hit, at least when the goat crackers weren’t being offered. 😉

Julie with Addie, Brie giving a kiss and Chai looking on

Clearly, Julie and her goats adore each other. It was so heartwarming to see. 💕

queen of the glacial erratic,
a quick detour on her way back to her barn

We walked with them back to their barn and got to see where they spend the night. What a treat and change of pace this visit was for us. Thank you, Bob & Julie!

unknown wayfarers

1.4.22 ~ Avery Farm Nature Preserve

I guess my feet know where they want me to go
Walking on a country road

~ James Taylor
♫ (Country Road) ♫

rusting away

We didn’t last too long out there, but we hadn’t had a walk since December 15th — because of all the holiday preparations and a long visit with family and bad weather — so we decided to go anyway, in spite of the temperature being 21°F/-6°C. With the light northwest wind the feels-like temperature was 10°F/-12°C. But the sunshine was bright and abundant!

frozen pool off Haley Brook

The brief moments I took my hand out of my glove to take these pictures were enough to turn my fingers painfully cold. Even quickly sticking the fingers back in the Thinsulate glove didn’t help. (All my other thermal layers were working superbly, though!) So that sent me back to the car to warm my hands in the warm air from the heater. Sigh. After we got home I looked online for some warmer mittens and will try them out as soon as they get here…

ice forming over running water

In our hurried pace back to the car we encountered an elderly man walking in the opposite direction. He gave us a very wide berth. We exchanged muffled good mornings but it was obvious that some of us are still trying to stay six feet apart, much like we were at the beginning of the pandemic. It made me reflect on how it was the same way with people when the Black Death was spreading in Scandinavia around 1350.

Haley Brook

Fourteen days later Kristin saw for the first time one sick of the plague. Rumor that the pest was raging in Nidaros and spreading through the country-side had come to Rissa — how, ’twas not easy to understand, for folk kept their houses, and every man fled to the woods or thickets if he saw an unknown wayfarer on the road; none would open his door to stranger-folk.
~ Sigrid Undset
(Kristin Lavransdatter: The Cross)

ice

Although we had a lovely visit focused on our family for the holidays there was the background worry about the continuing spread of covid. The positivity rate in Connecticut was 9% before the visit. After they left we saw it jump from 15% to 18% to 20% to 22% to 24%. We may be “done” with this pandemic but it certainly isn’t done with us. Our town has gone back to indoor mask mandates.

sunlit frozen beauty

I may be crazy, but we’re expecting a snowstorm, a good old-fashioned nor’easter tomorrow, and I am looking forward to it!!! Perhaps I should be careful what I wish for but it would be nice to feel a little bit of normal for January for a change.

harvest’s song

“The Harvest” by Camille Pissarro

She’ll come at dusky first of day,
White over yellow harvest’s song.
Upon her dewy rainbow way
She shall be beautiful and strong.
The lidless eye of noon shall spray
Tan on her ankles in the hay,
Shall kiss her brown the whole day long.

I’ll know her in the windrows, tall
Above the crickets of the hay.
I’ll know her when her odd eyes fall,
One May-blue, one November-grey.
I’ll watch her from the red barn wall
Take down her rusty scythe, and call,
And I will follow her away.

~ Francis Ledwidge
(August)

sunflower blossoms

7.24.21 ~ Buttonwood Farm, Griswold, Connecticut

So, last year we visited the sunflower field at the end of the harvest and I got a lot of pictures of blossoms past their peak, all still beautiful in their own way. This year we changed things up and went on the first day day of the gathering in and at a different time of day, evening instead of morning. Also unlike last year we’ve had plenty of rain while last summer we were dealing with a drought.

not much of a sunset…

Each year we plant over 14 acres of sunflowers and harvest approximately 300,000 blooms for your viewing pleasure and to benefit the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Connecticut, a non-profit organization dedicated to granting wishes to children with critical illnesses. Sunflowers are available while supplies last. We offer cut your sunflowers with a $2 per flower donation to the Make-A-Wish Foundation of Connecticut.
~ Buttonwood Farm website

There’s a small hill to climb to get a pretty view over a large field and then several paths to follow through the sea of sunflowers. This year I became fascinated with all the blossoms getting ready to bloom and wound up taking more pictures of them than the ones at their peaks!

feeling like we were behind people in a theater looking at the stage!

The crop must drink; we move the pipe
To draw the water back in time
To fall again upon the field,
So that the harvest may grow ripe,
The year complete its ancient rhyme
With other years, and a good yield
Complete our human hope.

~ Wendell Berry
(This Day: Collected & New Sabbath Poems)

head and shoulders above the rest
view from one of the paths
busy bee

When celebrating, always take your cue from nature and adapt your rituals to circumstances. … Adapting to circumstances, like actively observing on your walks, brings you into rhythm with the natural world. And soon, checking in to a festival becomes second nature, as you remember past experience. … May the spiral of our seasonal journey be blessed.
~ Penny Billington
(The Path of Druidry: Walking the Ancient Green Way)

more and more clouds
vapor trails ~ photo by Tim

Can you tell we’re under the flight path from New York to Europe?

It’s hard to believe that a year has passed and we’re still struggling with the coronavirus pandemic, in spite of being fully vaccinated. The delta variant is running rampant through the stubbornly unvaccinated population, but the concerning part is that even the vaccinated are at risk now. Here in Connecticut we’ve had 854 vaccinated people with breakthrough COVID cases, and 150 of them are hospitalized. We’re back to wearing masks in the grocery store and many indoor places, like our doctors, are still requiring them. So much for eating inside our favorite restaurant for a while… It’s a good thing we’ve gotten used to finding things to do outside!