Flåm Railway

5.23.15.7492

After we got off the train at Myrdal, we got onto the Flåm Railway (Flåmsbana), “a steep railway taking you past spectacular waterfalls, in and out of snow-capped mountains and ending up by the Aurlandsfjord.” The little village of Flåm is 2838′ (865m) below Myrdal and the train ride took about an hour.

5.23.15.7500

5.23.15.7513

There was a stop along the ride where we were allowed to get off the train and take pictures of the Kjosfossen Waterfall. Both ends of the train were still part way in the tunnels. Norway seems to be the land of tunnels and waterfalls, and presumably, trolls.

5.23.15.7515
Kjosfossen Waterfall

5.23.15.7520

5.23.15.7521

5.23.15.7523

5.23.15.7524

5.23.15.7525

5.23.15.7527

The total fall is 738′ (225m). In the picture below there is a woman in a red dress who came out of nowhere to sing and dance for the passengers. She gives a little perspective about the size of this magnificent waterfall.

5.23.15.7542

~~~

5.23.15.7555
back on the train and more scenic glimpses

5.23.15.7566

5.23.15.7567

5.23.15.7589

5.23.15.7591

5.23.15.7595
yours truly (cold, but having the time of my life!)

5.23.15.7598

5.23.15.7649
the little farm is in the late afternoon shadow of a nearby mountain

5.23.15.7655

5.23.15.7668

Apparently Norway is home to nine of the world’s 20 highest waterfalls. High or low, we found them cascading out of the mountains everywhere. No matter how many we saw they continued to dazzle us with their allure.

5.23.15.7745

When we arrived in Flåm, we checked in at the Flåmsbrygga Hotel and then had a scrumptious Viking-style dinner at the Ægir Brewery & Pub. It was very late when we headed for bed, yet it was still light out. The picture above was taken from our hotel balcony and was the last breathtaking scene I savored before falling asleep.

In winter I get up at night
And dress by yellow candle-light.
In summer, quite the other way,
I have to go to bed by day.
~ Robert Louis Stevenson
(A Child’s Garden of Verses)

14 thoughts on “Flåm Railway”

    1. It’s so easy to lose perspective there – so many waterfalls in all sizes and shapes, some trickling, some roaring. Every time we turned around we encountered another waterfall… This one was mighty impressive.

    1. My sister lived in Sweden for a year and she was surprised about the spectacular waterfalls in Norway, too!

  1. I’m sure that my heart rate increased as I looked through the waterfall photos, Barbara! What breath-taking scenery you have seen in Norway, exquisite! And a wonderful photo of you, looking cold, but contented. What a magical train ride. 🙂

    1. Thank you, Joanne! 🙂 Now that I know about waterfalls in Norway – no longer able to recall what I had expected to find there – I find myself wanting to go back and see more of them some day. They are as mesmerizing and captivating to me as the sea…

  2. Magnificent! Oh, the train moves through the wonders of snowland. Its picturesque! It appears a bit scary to me, I don’t know how it really feels. The lady in the red dress looks like a lost fairy. And you look fabulous, the glow of the amazing trip is on you. The waterfalls are great, I also visited waterfalls last weekend here nearby, I think its time that I blog. A lot has happened of late.

    1. Thank you, Sonali! I’ve been missing your blog posts. It would be a thrill to see some pictures of waterfalls in India. Your country is just as exotic and full of wonders that I find hard to imagine being there, too. I just googled “waterfalls in India” and up popped some spectacular images – wondering which one was the one you visited. Do write a post!!!

Comments welcome...

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.