sprightly

8.27.16.3950
8.27.16 ~ probably a juvenile great black-backed gull

So… Yesterday there were three cormorants sitting on the breakwater, closer to land than I’ve ever seen them before. But, confound it, still too far away for a decent picture. And of course, they had no interest in spreading their wings out to dry. So tantalizingly close by, yet still so far away…

8.27.16.3944
8.27.16 ~ cormorants on the end of the breakwater at high tide

However, in my efforts to get as close as I could to the cormorants, I discovered a large group of gulls wading in the rocky pools created by high tide.

8.27.16.3960
8.27.16 ~ herring gull, wading
8.27.16.3964
8.27.16 ~ herring gull, rock climbing
8.27.16.3973
8.27.16 ~ herring gull, waiting for the next wave to cool off his feet

A few days ago my gull friend with the mangled foot came back! He was sitting on the white post in front of us as we sat down on a bench to eat our supper. 🙂 He took off several times, soaring up high and circling around the beach house and landing each time again on the post in front of us. I think he was trying to demonstrate that he was just fine, thank you. He seems so healthy and energetic now — he must have recovered from whatever malady was troubling him earlier this summer.

8.27.16.3982
8.27.16 ~ look who is back!!!

Yesterday I spotted him hanging out with the other gulls on the rocks. He was getting a drink of water. Gulls are able to drink salt water or fresh water.

8.27.16.3990
8.27.16
8.27.16.3995
8.27.16 ~ posing for me – doesn’t he look sprightly?

My family thinks I should come up with a name for him but for some reason I can’t think of one. I’m also not even sure if “he” is male or female.

8.27.16.3997
8.27.16 ~ more drinking
8.27.16.3998
8.27.16 ~ so refreshing!
8.27.16.4002
8.27.16

After his thirst was quenched he decided to walk over to investigate a noisy group of gulls nearby.

8.27.16.4009
8.27.16
8.27.16.4010
8.27.16 ~ walking with a sense of purpose
8.27.16.4016
8.27.16 ~ pausing to listen and contemplate

Meanwhile, another herring gull walked into view. He’s pretty handsome, too.

8.27.16.4075
8.27.16 ~ another herring gull

It seemed like everyone wanted their pictures taken!

8.27.16.4092
8.27.16 ~ another juvenile great black-backed gull
8.27.16.4096
8.27.16 ~ juvenile great black-backed gull

I’m still amazed that the juvenile great black-baked gulls are larger than the adult herring gulls. In fact, they are the largest species of gull in the world.

We didn’t see any laughing gulls this day, who are smaller than the herring gulls, but had seen several of them a few days beforehand.

8.27.16.4106
8.27.16 ~ Mystic Whaler heading out for a dinner cruise…

Summer is winding down, but it’s still hazy, hot and humid. We are close to setting a record for the hottest August in Connecticut weather history. Sigh… Looking forward to October!

8 thoughts on “sprightly”

  1. Love your photos. Happy that “hoppy” is back. Hot summer here too which is very unusual. We’re loaded with cormorants here. We could probably spare you a few.

    1. Thanks, Sybil. We’ve got plenty of cormorants but they usually occupy a tiny island offshore. I bet you could kayak out there and get a few shots for me. 🙂

  2. Even though the cormorants didn’t get as close as you’d like, I really like the photo. They are beautiful on the rocks with the water in the background. And, I learned something today. Your comment about sea gulls being able to drink either fresh or salt water, made me realize that I’d never previously thought about what sea birds drank.

    1. Thank you, Sheryl, I’m so pleased you liked the cormorant photo – I almost didn’t bother including it. It’s kind of nice the way that no matter how long we’ve been kicking around on this planet, and no matter how much we already seem to know, there is always more to learn, and some of it is about something as ordinary as a gull getting a drink. I have to admit that I looked it up because I had never seen a gull drinking before. 🙂

  3. I’m sure your seagull friend is actually an incredibly amazing gull who leads a double life. When he disappears, he is probably trying to fly faster and higher than any other seagull has – just like Jonathon Livingston Seagull. He’s a very special bird. 🙂

    1. He really is. You know, I’m starting to recognize him when he is in the air because his lame foot doesn’t lay flat against his body the way the other one does. His wings are very strong – they must be to compensate for the drag that foot must be causing. I am so very fond of him. 🙂

  4. “A few days ago my gull friend with the mangled foot came back! He was sitting on the white post in front of us as we sat down on a bench to eat our supper. 🙂 He took off several times, soaring up high and circling around the beach house and landing each time again on the post in front of us. I think he was trying to demonstrate that he was just fine, thank you. He seems so healthy and energetic now — he must have recovered from whatever malady was troubling him earlier this summer.”

    such good news Barbara, excellent photos 🙂
    Tai

Comments welcome...

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.