devoted to trees

3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut
trailhead ~ 3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut

This past weekend we took a long walk in the woods at Connecticut College Arboretum, and found ourselves fascinated with all the dead and dying trees. Some have been recently toppled, either by Hurricane Sandy or Blizzard Charlotte. This is the time of year to see deep into the woods, before the view is obscured by green foliage.

3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut
a mighty one fallen ~ 3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut

This fallen tree brought underground stones, embedded in its root system, up into the air, along with the soil.

3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut
3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut
3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut
Tim (5’8″) to give some perspective ~ 3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut
3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut
skunk cabbage ~ 3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut

Skunk cabbage is one of the first plants to bloom in spring. Its flowers are often partly or wholly hidden beneath last year’s fallen leaves. Like many other dark-colored flowers, skunk cabbage is pollinated mostly by flies. The flowers actually produce heat — a benefit to the flies out in cold weather. The leaves emerge after the flowers. They smell unpleasant if they are crushed, hence the name “skunk cabbage.”
~ Connecticut Botanical Society

3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut
dying of natural causes ~ 3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut
3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut
living with scars and imperfections ~ 3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut
3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut
roots anchored in massive boulders ~ 3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut
3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut
boulders deposited by ancient glaciers ~ 3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut
3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut
3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut
3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut
roots partly above water ~ 3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut
3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut
swamp reflections ~ 3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut
3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut
mushrooms! ~ 3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut
3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut
3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut

Imperfection is in some sort essential to all that we know of life. It is a sign of life in a mortal body, that is to say, a state of progress and change. Nothing that lives is, or can be rigidly perfect; part of it is decaying, part nascent.
~ John Ruskin
(The Stones of Venice)

3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut
a new life, just a few inches tall ~ 3.23.13 ~ New London, Connecticut

20 thoughts on “devoted to trees”

    1. Thank you, Hanneke! I never get tired of looking at trees and absorbing the wisdom they impart…

    1. Thank you, Monica! Six inches of snow would be a big deal around these parts – there is a line of thunderstorms approaching us now – a little more spring-like.

    1. Thank you, Sybil! I’m glad you tagged along and appreciated picture after picture of trees…

  1. After a long winter, a walk on a nice spring day is so refreshing and renewing. I really like how you shared pictures that illustrate various stages in the life of a forest.

    1. That’s so true, Sheryl – we could really feel the “pause” before springtime will blossom forth in all its glory. Thinking of the stories these aged trees could share with us…

  2. Hi Barbara. The imperfections seem to create the most interesting photos. I think we share so much with the trees, our blemishes being the least of these. Jane

    1. I agree with you, Jane. The wise old trees teach us how compelling and lovely flaws and foibles are to all of us who live in harmony with nature.

    1. Thank you, Kathy. It’s awe-inspiring to try to imagine the power of a wind gust that is capable of uprooting a tree so securely attached to the earth…

    1. Thank you, Tracy! It is amazing to me that tree roots can expand and pry rocks open as they grow…

  3. I have had to learn that imperfection is not for correcting but embracing … for vulnerability is the essence of life. What better than to look to nature for this lesson. Lovely post!

    1. Thank you, Diane! I have had to learn these things, too… “Vulnerability is the essence of life.” I will be meditating on your thought for a couple of days – it resonated with me – thank you…

    1. Thank you, Robin! Trees do have a sculptural beauty to them, even as they slowly die and add their essence back to the earth and to the circle of life…

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