Hurricane Sandy II

10.30.12 ~ Eastern Point Beach
sand so deep it covered the curbs ~ 10.30.12 ~ Eastern Point Beach
10.30.12 ~ Eastern Point Beach
sand covering the road, the entrance, the grass, the playground
10.30.12 ~ Eastern Point Beach
sand and seaweed caught in the fence
10.30.12 ~ Eastern Point Beach
the wall between the beach and the playground

The surge took large chunks of stone from the top of the wall separating the sandy beach from the grassy playground. The playground was now covered with sand and rocks from the wall. The sidewalk running along the playground side of the wall was badly damaged, too.

10.30.12 ~ Eastern Point Beach
10.30.12 ~ Eastern Point Beach
10.30.12 ~ Eastern Point Beach
10.30.12 ~ Eastern Point Beach
10.30.12 ~ Eastern Point Beach
Barbara contemplating the awesome power of Mother Nature
10.30.12 ~ Eastern Point Beach
10.30.12 ~ Eastern Point Beach
10.30.12 ~ Eastern Point Beach
there is normally a good stretch of sand between the life guard chair and the water
10.30.12 ~ Eastern Point Beach
driftwood in the foreground, Avery Point campus in the distance

Still more pictures coming soon!

14 thoughts on “Hurricane Sandy II”

  1. Mother Nature is one tough cookie. Do you know if Groton Long Point sustained the same degree of damage, or if any marinas/boats got slammed? We used to be at Spicer’s. The boats piled up and strewn around NJ are just unbelievable.

    1. We haven’t been to Groton Long Point, Noank, Mystic or Stonington since the storm hit – the first free time we had we went up north to see how the family was doing. There are some pictures of the storm aftermath posted here… http://www.mygrotonlongpoint.com/

      Have you ever eaten at the Seahorse Restaurant at Spicer’s Marina? We’ve lived here for years and have never gotten around to trying it…

      1. Thank you for that link, Barbara. The photo with the buckled sidewalk marked with a lobster buoy is a classic. It looks like, maybe, just maybe, there wasn’t too much damage there – relatively speaking.

        Oh, yes, we had many meals at the Seahorse. The bar side is almost “gritty” compared to the restaurant side, which is pretty nice. We never had a bad meal on either side, just can’t remember WHAT we had to make any suggestions. Sigh.

        1. You’re welcome, AA! Maybe I’ll suggest the Seahorse the next time we decide to eat out – I’m sure we’ll have no trouble picking something out off the menu! 🙂

  2. What a clean up there will be! We’ve heard estimated reports of the cost to repair all of the damage….incredible! When natural disasters hit in Australia, the news is always followed by reports of the community being brought together and working together for a common cause. I do hope you are hearing such stories over there.

    1. One story that caught my eye was about the New York City Marathon that was scheduled for Saturday. The run was canceled and all the athletes that had made it into the city for the race decided to stay and help distribute relief aid to the residents of the decimated Staten Island. It’s going to take years, I think, to rebuild and restore…

    1. We went down to the beach yesterday to see how the sand removal is coming along – will try to get some new pictures up soon…

  3. Amazing how Mother Nature wreaks havoc so swiftly and leaves such damage. You’ve captured the damage here and I like the photo of “Barbara contemplating the awesome power of Mother Nature.”

    1. Thank you, Linda. I showed these pictures to my father, who had lived through the Great New England Hurricane of 1938, which hit without warning as he was walking home from high school. He wasn’t impressed. He said the ’38 hurricane caused far more damage as it swept many houses along the shoreline away and about 600 people were killed. His little sister had stayed home from school sick that day, and his mother was caught visiting at a neighbor’s farm and stayed there for the duration. My father remembered helping his father shore up one of the walls of their farmhouse from the inside.

      1. That’s some weather event, a hurricane that caused 600 deaths. Why did we never learn about that event and the casualties in school? There was a time I used to think some Southern states were the way to go … no tornado or derecho worries like in the Midwest and/or Tornado Alley, no hurricanes, earthquakes, but now the southern states deal with snow and ice frequently … no place is safe anymore.

        1. I agree, no place feels safe anymore. Sometimes I dream of moving to Vermont to escape but I’m sure there would be problems there, too. Living is a risky business…

          1. Yes indeed and Vermont is where you want to be. I just heard that same stat yesterday after our latest freeway shooting. Detroit rates pretty low on the totem pole for safe cities and Michigan as a whole does not fare well. Lucky for folks who live in Vermont, the safest city in the U.S.

          2. I was thinking of migrating to Vermont because of climate change but I’m glad to see that it’s the safest state in the country, crime-wise, too. Hmmmm…

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