Hurricane Sandy I

10.30.12 ~ Groton, Connecticut
a fallen tree across the street from our condo complex ~ 10.30.12 ~ Groton, Connecticut

Tuesday morning we went down to see how our beloved beach had fared in the storm. We kept taking turns with the camera so I’ll credit us both with the pictures in this post! Beach Pond Road was closed to traffic so we walked by the pond on our way to Eastern Point Beach. The storm surge had breached the dunes separating the pond from Long Island Sound, and pushed the water and debris across the street and up onto the lawns across the street.

10.30.12 ~ Groton, Connecticut
10.30.12 ~ Groton, Connecticut
10.30.12 ~ Groton, Connecticut
the surge had not fully receded from its highest level ~ 10.30.12 ~ Beach Pond Rd, Groton, Connecticut
10.30.12 ~ Groton, Connecticut
view of the flooded pond, dunes and Long Island Sound in the background ~ 10.30.12 ~ Groton, Connecticut
10.30.12 ~ Groton, Connecticut
same view, the bushes in the foreground were still surrounded by water ~ 10.30.12 ~ Groton, Connecticut

I think city workers had already plowed away the sand on the road because we were not at all prepared for the scene that awaited us when we got to the beach itself! The road there was covered with about a foot and a half of sand!

10.30.12 ~ Groton, Connecticut
10.30.12 ~ Groton, Connecticut
10.30.12 ~ Groton, Connecticut
basketball court covered in sand ~ 10.30.12 ~ Groton, Connecticut
10.30.12 ~ Groton, Connecticut
looks like the top of a tree from who-knows-where ~ 10.30.12 ~ Groton, Connecticut
10.30.12 ~ Groton, Connecticut
Tyler House still surrounded by high water ~ 10.30.12 ~ Groton, Connecticut
10.30.12 ~ Groton, Connecticut
a park bench turned over and buried in the sand ~ 10.30.12 ~ Groton, Connecticut
10.30.12 ~ Groton, Connecticut
amazed that we could step over the buried chain link fence ~ 10.30.12 ~ Groton, Connecticut

More pictures coming soon!

6 thoughts on “Hurricane Sandy I”

    1. It was a sight to behold, AA! We were in kind of a daze trying to imagine how far inland the surge and waves must have came at high tide the night before.

    1. Thank you, Stephanie! 🙂 Mother Nature is certainly a force to be reckoned with, and has a way of reminding us every so often of her incredible power.

  1. You were in my thoughts often during the week Barbara as I knew that you lived somewhere near where the storm was pradicted to hit. We’d be lost without the advance warnings being given; imagine not being forewarned! These are incredible scenes and show the power of nature to the full. I’m so pleased to hear that you are safe.

    1. Thank you for thinking of me, Joanne. That’s what was so amazing about that 1938 hurricane, no real warning unless you happened to read the newspaper. My father was walking home from high school when it struck and he was amazed and frightened by the force of the winds. When he got home he discovered his mom wasn’t home so he and his father were terribly worried about her. She had been visiting a neighbor and had decided she would be safer to stay put where she was. It was terrifying for all of them. We are lucky to get so much advanced warning these days. So very fortunate!

Comments welcome...

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.