Groundhog Day

Technically winter will be over in 6½ weeks no matter what the groundhog says, but because he didn’t see his shadow today, there is hope for an early arrival of spring-like weather.

Our groundhog, Basil, refused to step outside in the raging ice storm for his shadow-less annual photo shoot. So we put him in front of the sliding glass door with one of Brigid’s lambs. No shadows to be seen anywhere! Come spring!

Basil is named for my paternal grandfather, who was born on Groundhog Day, February 2, 1882 in the village now known as Ivano-Frankovsk, Ukraine. When Pop arrived in America at Ellis Island in 1909, instead of translating his name, Wasyl, to its equivalent in English, Basil, the immigration worker wrote his name down as William, by which he was known for the rest of his life.

Last year the sun was shining brightly, so we took Basil down to Eastern Point Beach for pictures.

14 thoughts on “Groundhog Day

  1. Oh this is an adorable post Barbara! LOVE your groundhog – and your little lambs too. I’ve always wondered how Puxatawny Phil could NOT see his shadow with all those lights for the cameras that must be on him!

  2. I’m glad to hear you’re predicting an early spring! Love the photo of Basil on the beach. And interesting story about your grandfather and his name – so many people’s names must have been changed in this way.

    • So true – I knew that surnames were often altered, but remember how surprised I was to discover an altered given name.

      And sometimes there was no surname, just a patronymic to be dealt with. My 3rd-great-grandfather was Ingebrigt Martinus Hansen, changed to Martin Thompson. I finally found his father in Norway, Hans Tønnesen. So it was the Tønnesen that became Thompson.

      I forgot to notice last year if Basil’s prediction came true!

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